asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: AUSTRALIA

Originally located in Arnhem Land, The Australian College of Sorcery and Witchcraft was a sprawling campus of large huts that eventually coalesced into one single structure. The college detached from mainland Australia soon after British settlement in order maintain their practices and culture. Ever since, the school has been drifting haphazardly in the ocean, although it never strays far from the Australian coast for ancient magic keeps the school tethered to Australian soil. Every year, a team of witches and wizards must be employed to anchor the floating campus so students aren’t forced into a cat-and-mouse chase at the beginning of the year in order to attend school (a frustrating endeavour which often results in the postponing of classes due to a large number of absences). To students’ great enjoyment, various creatures (including the occasional mermaid) can often be found sunbathing around the perimeter of the campus which gently slopes into the water. Due to their exposure to unusually friendly oceanic creatures, the college boasts incredibly extensive courses in aquatic-life studies, and is held in high esteem by the international wizarding community for its innovations in water magic. 
2nd September, 1994.I took this photo just before I left Sydney, a bit over a year ago now. It’s such a beautiful place in the city, as well as being important to me, so Tom and I walked through the gardens and out to the point a bit before sunset. I can’t remember exactly how long ago it was that we sold the farm and had to move Mum’s ashes here, but I guess Jem was still quite small because we were still somewhat worried about him ending up in the water. 
Recently I’ve been thinking about her a lot more, and wondering if parts of myself would make more sense if I had been able to have certain conversations with her. As much as it’s wonderful to have the memories and reminiscences of her friends and family, there are many things they can’t tell me. That’s okay, I mean, lots of people have trouble communicating with their parents even when they’re alive, and I can see the myriad ways in which both my living parents have had enormous impact on who I am. It’s just something I’ll always wonder about.Twenty years is a really long time.

2nd September, 1994.

I took this photo just before I left Sydney, a bit over a year ago now. It’s such a beautiful place in the city, as well as being important to me, so Tom and I walked through the gardens and out to the point a bit before sunset. I can’t remember exactly how long ago it was that we sold the farm and had to move Mum’s ashes here, but I guess Jem was still quite small because we were still somewhat worried about him ending up in the water. 

Recently I’ve been thinking about her a lot more, and wondering if parts of myself would make more sense if I had been able to have certain conversations with her. As much as it’s wonderful to have the memories and reminiscences of her friends and family, there are many things they can’t tell me. That’s okay, I mean, lots of people have trouble communicating with their parents even when they’re alive, and I can see the myriad ways in which both my living parents have had enormous impact on who I am. It’s just something I’ll always wonder about.

Twenty years is a really long time.

  1. You are stronger than you realise.
  2. You are crueller than you realise.
  3. The smallest words will break your heart.
  4. You will change. You’re not the same person you were three years ago. You’re not even the same person you were three minutes ago and that’s okay. Especially if you don’t like the person you were three minutes ago.
  5. People come and go. Some are cigarette breaks, others are forest fires.
  6. You won’t like your name until you hear someone say it in their sleep.
  7. You’ll forget your email password but ten years from now you’ll still remember the number of steps up to his flat.
  8. You don’t have to open the curtains if you don’t want to.
  9. Never stop yourself texting someone. If you love them at 4 a.m., tell them. If you still love them at 9.30 a.m., tell them again.
  10. Make sure you have a safe place. Whether it’s the kitchen floor or the Travel section of a bookshop, just make sure you have a safe place.
  11. You will be scared of all kinds of things, of spiders and clowns and eating alone, but your biggest fear will be that people will see you the way you see yourself.
  12. Sometimes, looking at someone will be like looking into the sun. Sometimes someone will look at you like you are the sun. Wait for it.
  13. You will learn how to sleep alone, how to avoid the cold corners but still fill a bed.
  14. Always be friends with the broken people. They know how to survive.
  15. You can love someone and hate them, all at once. You can miss them so much you ache but still ignore your phone when they call.
  16. You are good at something, whether it’s making someone laugh or remembering their birthday. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that these things don’t matter.
  17. You will always be hungry for love. Always. Even when someone is asleep next to you you’ll envy the pillow touching their cheek and the sheet hiding their skin.
  18. Loneliness is nothing to do with how many people are around you but how many of them understand you.
  19. People say I love you all the time. Even when they say, ‘Why didn’t you call me back?’ or ‘He’s an asshole.’ Make sure you’re listening.
  20. You will be okay.
  21. You will be okay.

21 things my father never told me (via motelstyles)